The Fellowship of the Ring – Annotated Transcript

Both theatrical and Extended editions
Annotation
Theatrical only
Extended addition

The Fellowship of the Ring
Voice of Galadriel: I amar prestar aen. The world is changed.
Han mathon ne nen. I feel it in the water.
Han mathon ne chae. I feel it in the earth.
A han noston ned gwilith. I smell it in the air.
Much that once was is lost. For none now live who remember it.
It began with the forging of the Great Rings.

Book 2: Chapter X – The Breaking of the Fellowship 388) Frodo: ‘The world is changing…’
Book 6: Chapter VI – Many Partings 959) Treebeard: ‘For the world is changing: I feel it in the water. I feel it in the earth.
I smell it in the air.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 242) Aragorn: ‘But now the world is changing once again. A new hour comes.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 50) Gandalf: ‘The beginnings lie back in the Black Years, which only the lore masters now remember.’
Book 3: Chapter VII – Helm’s Deep 526) Théoden: ‘The world changes, and all that once was strong now proves unsure.’

Three hands are seen, each bearing a Ring on its middle finger, and each Ring is set with a jewel. Three elves – Galadriel, Gil-galad, and Cirdan – regard the Rings on their hands.
Appendix B 1059) Throughout the Third Age, the guardianship of the Three Rings was known only to those who possessed them. But at the end it became known that they had been held at first by the three greatest of the Eldar: Gil-galad, Galadriel, and Círdan.
Three were given to the Elves: immortal, wisest and fairest of all beings.
Seven to the Dwarf-lords: great miners and artisans of the mountain halls.

Dwarves reach simultaneously for seven Rings that rest on a small cloth-covered table. They hold them up to study them, than all raise them aloft.
And nine. Nine Rings were gifted to the race of Men, who above all else desire power.
Nine Men, standing in a ‘V’ formation, hold their Rings high before them, but all stare blankly forward. They all slowly lower their hands to their sides, never blinking, and then disappear into darkness.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 49)
Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 50) ‘The three, fairest of all, the elf-lords hid from him. … Seven the Dwarf-kings possessed… Nine he gave to Mortal Men, proud and great, and so ensnared them.’’

For within these Rings was bound the strength and will to govern each race. But they were all of them deceived.
For another Ring was made. In the land of Mordor, in the fires of Mount Doom, the Dark Lord Sauron forged in secret a master Ring to control all others. And into this Ring he poured his cruelty, his malice, and his will to dominate all life.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 50) In the Land of Mordor, where the Shadows lie.
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 236) [Sauron] forged secretly in the Mountain of Fire the One Ring to be their master.

Armored Sauron emerges from flame, his gauntleted right hand bearing a plain gold Ring on its forefinger. Elvish letters flare into fiery life along the band.
One Ring to rule them all.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 50) One Ring to rule them all, One Ring to find them…

A dark cloud originating from Mordor spreads to the rest of Middle-earth.
One by one, free lands of Middle-earth fell to the power of the Ring.
A village in Middle-earth, where people are running away from Orcs, who are brandishing axes, and burning down houses.
But there were some who resisted.
Men, an army of Men, their swords and helms shining, stride across a battlefield, and against them comes a black seething mass of the enemy raising a cloud of dust behind it. The crest of Mount Doom is ablaze.
A Last Alliance of Men and Elves marched against the armies of Mordor. And on the slopes of Mount Doom, they fought for the freedom of Middle-earth.

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 236) Elrond: ‘But Sauron of Mordor assailed them, and they made the Last Alliance of Elves and Men, and the hosts of Gil-galad and Elendil were mustered in Arnor.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 237) ‘I was the herald of Gil-galad and marched with his host … the spear of Gil-galad and the Sword of Elendil, Aiglos and Narsil, none could withstand. I beheld the last combat on the slopes of Orodruin, where Gil-galad died, and Elendil fell, and Narsil broke beneath him…’

Elrond: Tangado haid! Hado i philinn!
{Hold [your] positions! Fire the arrows!}
At his shouted command a flight of arrows is fired, cutting down the front rows of Orcs. Shields are raised.
Victory was near. But the power of the Ring could not be undone.
The Elven swordsmen cut into the mass of Orcs with beautiful precision. Gil-galad drives his spear into an enemy. Suddenly, battle pauses: Sauron approaches, the lettering on the Ring clearly bright and visible. Men and Elves stop, look around … and up. Many edge away. Sauron lays about with his mace, and with each stroke knots of allies are flung through the air. Elendil alone rushes forward to attack Sauron, but he too is caught by the mace and sent flying against a rocky outcropping, his sword falling several feet away from his body. Isildur runs to his father, pulling off his own helm, holds his father the king’s face in his hands for a moment – a moment is all he has to grieve, for Sauron comes to stand over them.
It was in this moment, when all hope had faded, that Isildur, son of the king, took up his father’s sword.
In fury, Isildur lunges to take up his father’s sword, but Sauron steps on it before it can leave the ground – it shatters. But Isildur, still holding the hilt to which a length of blade is still attached, slashes wildly at Sauron as he reaches for him – and the four fingers of Sauron’s right hand, including the Ring, fall to the ground. Sauron, falling backward, first sucks everything into him on a strong wind – then expels it all in a shockwave that flattens both armies and seems to destroy most of his soldiers.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past51) Gandalf: ‘It was Gil-galad, Elven-king, and Elendil of Westernesse who overthrew Sauron, though they themselves perished in the deed; and Isildur Elendil’s son cut the Ring from Sauron’s hand and took it for his own. …’
Sauron, the enemy of the Free peoples of Middle-earth, was defeated.

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 237) Elrond: ‘Sauron was diminished, but not destroyed.’

In wonder, Isildur picks up Sauron’s finger, and the Ring on it.
The Ring passed to Isildur, who had this one chance to destroy evil forever.
The long black finger crumbles to coarse black dust, leaving the Ring gleaming in Isildur’s gloved hand. As he holds it, the Ring shrinks in size, from a circle large enough to fit Sauron’s gloved hand to one sized for Isildur.
But the hearts of men are easily corrupted. And the Ring of Power has a will of its own.

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 237) Elrond: ‘I beheld the last combat on the slopes of Orodruin, where Gil-galad died, and Elendil fell, and Narsil broke beneath him; but Sauron himself was overthrown, and Isildur cut the Ring from his hand with the hilt-shard of his father’s sword, and took it for his own.’ ‘…Isildur took it, as should never have been. It should have been cast into Orodruin’s fire nigh at hand where it was made. But few marked what Isildur did. He alone stood by his father in that last mortal contest – only Círdan stood, and I. But Isildur would not listen to our counsel. “This I will have as weregild for my father, and my brother,” he said, and therefore whether we would or no, he took it, to treasure it. …’
Book 2: Chapter IX – The Great River 54) Gandalf: ‘A Ring of Power looks after itself, Frodo. … The Ring left him.’

Isildur rides on a white horse, leading a troop of Men along a wooded path; the Ring is openly worn on a long chain about his neck. There is a sudden attack from the trees, and a large Orc leaps to take Isildur from his horse amid a moment of chaos.
It betrayed Isildur to his death.

There are several moments of chaos – Isildur picks himself up from the ground. The battle has carried past him, and his men are fighting – and dying – behind him. He yanks the Ring, breaking the chain it hung from, and puts it on the forefinger of his left hand, vanishing. A disturbance is seen along the Riverbank, and then in the water – then suddenly Isildur is visible again in the water, reaching for the Ring that has slipped from his finger and is sinking. Orc archers on the shore spot him as well and fire.

Isildur floats, facedown, in the River, with three arrows in his back. The Ring drops down through murky water.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 51) ‘But the Ring was lost. It fell into the Great River, Anduin, and vanished. For Isildur was marching north along the east banks of the River, and near the Gladden Fields he was waylaid by the Orcs of the Mountains, and almost all his folk were slain. He leaped into the waters, but the Ring slipped from his finger as he swam, and then the Orcs saw him and killed him with arrows.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 54) Gandalf: ‘It had slipped from Isildur’s hand and betrayed him…’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 237) Elrond: ‘… But he was betrayed by it to his death.’

And some things that should not have been forgotten were lost. History became legend; legend became myth. And for two and a half thousand years the Ring passed out of all knowledge. Until, when chance came, it ensnared a new bearer.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 51) ‘And there in the dark pools amid the Gladden Fields,’ [Gandalf] said, ‘the Ring passed out of knowledge and legend; and even so much of its history is known now only to a few, and the Council of the Wise could discover no more.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 53) Gandalf: ‘…He wormed his way like a maggot into the heart of the hills, and vanished out of all knowledge.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 238) Elrond ‘In the days of Isildur the Ruling Ring passed out of all knowledge.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 54) Gandalf: ‘…then when a chance came it caught poor Déagol, and he was murdered….’
Appendices: Isildur claimed the One Ring 3441: last year of the Second Age: Gollum found Ring about 2463; Bilbo found Ring 2941

The Ring is just visible in the sand of the riverbed, and a hand reaches to scoop it up. Then a new hand, gray-green and filthy, is seen slowly, covetously opening to reveal the Ring in its palm.
Gollum: My preciousss.
The Ring came to the creature Gollum, who took it deep into the tunnels of the Misty Mountains. And there it consumed him.
We see Gollum, deep in a cave, squatting on a rock, crooning to the ring in his hand.
Gollum: It came to me. My own. My love. My own. My Preciousss… gollum…

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 53) Gandalf: ‘…He wormed his way like a maggot into the heart of the hills, and vanished out of all knowledge.’
The Hobbit 87) Gollum: ‘It came to me on my birthday, my precious.’

The Ring brought to Gollum unnatural long life. For five hundred years it poisoned his mind. And in the gloom of Gollum’s cave it waited.
Darkness crept back in the forest of the world. Rumour grew of a shadow in the East, whispers of a nameless fear.
And the Ring of Power perceived its time had now come.

The Ring falls, bouncing, down a rock, with each strike against the stone making an unnaturally loud, hard metallic sound.
It abandoned Gollum. But something happened then the Ring did not intend. It was picked up by the most unlikely creature imaginable.
The Ring lies in the dirt among fish bones, until a groping hand encounters it.
Bilbo: What’s this?
A hobbit. Bilbo Baggins of the Shire.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 54) Gandalf: ‘There was more than one power at work, Frodo. The Ring was trying to get back to its master. It had slipped from Isildur’s hand and betrayed him; then when a chance came it caught poor Déagol, and he was murdered; and after that Gollum, and it had devoured him…. So now, when its master was awake once more and sending out his dark thought from Mirkwood, it abandoned Gollum. Only to be picked up by the most unlikely person imaginable: Bilbo from the Shire!’

Bilbo, lying on his stomach where he’s stopped crawling, holds the Ring up to look at it, and smiles in surprised wonder.
Bilbo: A ring.
Gollum (In the distance): Lost! My Precious is lost!

The Hobbit 76) He put the ring in his pocket almost without thinking; certainly it did not seem to be of any particular use at the moment.
The Hobbit 88) ‘Lossst it is, my precious, lost, lost! Curse us and crush us, my precious is lost!’
Prologue: Of the Finding of the Ring 12) But the ring was not on the island, he had lost it, it was gone. His screech sent a shiver down Bilbo’s back…

At Gollum’s voice, Bilbo starts, scrambles to his feet, and almost without thinking tucks the Ring into the pocket of his coat.

Prologue: Of the Finding of the Ring 11) …and it happened that Bilbo was lost for a while in the black orc-mines deep under the mountains, and there, as he groped in vain in the dark, he put his hand on a ring, lying on the floor of a tunnel.
He put it in his pocket… At the bottom of the tunnel lay a cold lake far from the light, and on an island of rock in the water lived Gollum. He was a loathsome little creature … peering with pale luminous eyes …

For the time would soon come when hobbits would shape the fortunes of all.
******************************************************************************************************************************************
‘The Shire… 60 years later.’
Frodo Baggins is sitting against a tree, straw in his mouth, reading a book.
A deep voice singing comes in earshot. Frodo looks up from his book, looks around as if trying to be sure of what he is hearing. The words become clearer.
A deep voice singing comes in earshot. Frodo looks up from his book, looks around as if trying to be sure of what he is hearing. The words become clearer.
Gandalf: (singing) Down from the door where it began… His voice trails off to humming.
Frodo jumps to his feet, taking the straw out of his mouth as he does so. He grins, and eagerly begins to run.
Gandalf: (Sings)
The Road goes ever on and on,
Down from the door where it began,
Now far ahead the road has gone,
And I must follow if I can.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 35) Bilbo:
The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 24) At the end of the second week of September a cart came in through Bywater from the direction of the Brandywine Bridge in broad daylight. An old man was driving it all alone. He wore a tall pointed blue hat, a long grey cloak, and a silver scarf. He had a long white beard and bushy eyebrows that stuck out beyond the brim of his hat.

Frodo runs to the edge of the sunken road, to a point where he can intercept Gandalf. As the cart comes up level with him, he speaks sternly, arms folded in front of him.
Frodo: You’re late.
Gandalf reins in and looks up slowly, and just as sternly, from under the wide brim of his gray hat.
Gandalf: A wizard is never late, Frodo Baggins. Nor is he early. He arrives precisely when he means to.
They both try to keep a straight face, but both fail and both laugh richly. Frodo leaps onto the wagon, arms outstretched, to embrace his old friend.
Frodo: It’s wonderful to see you, Gandalf!
Gandalf (laughing, holds him tight for a moment): You didn’t think I’d miss your Uncle Bilbo’s birthday?

Prologue 10) Frodo [Bilbo’s] favorite ‘nephew’

Frodo (sitting beside him): What news of the outside world? Tell me everything.
Gandalf: Everything? You’re far too eager and curious for a hobbit. Most unnatural… Well, what can I tell you? Life in the wide world goes on, much as it has this past Age. (They jog past the mill) Full of its own comes and goings. Scarcely aware of the existence of Hobbits. (Quietly, to himself) For which I am very thankful. (They cross over a narrow stone bridge.)
The cart moves through a marketplace, where it creates a stir.

Book 3: Chapter XI – The Palantír 584)Pippin: ‘But I should like to know—’
‘Mercy!’ cried Gandalf. ‘If the giving of information is to be the cure of your inquisitiveness, I shall spend all the rest of my days in answering you….’
Prologue 2) Yet it is clear that Hobbits had, in fact, lived quietly in Middle-earth for many long years before other folk became even aware of them.

Hobbit woman (waving): Look! It’s Gandalf!
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party
25) …The old man smiled. They knew him by sight …

… and then begins its way through fields. They come to a field with a large, beautiful tree, where several hobbits are erecting a tent, and others (with more immediate success) are raising a yellow banner that reads ‘Happy Birthday Bilbo Baggins’.
Gandalf: Ooh – The long expected party.

Title – Book 1 Chapter 1: A Long-Expected Party

Gandalf: So how is the old rascal? I hear it’s going to be a party of special magnificence.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 21) … Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence.
Frodo: You know Bilbo. He’s got the whole place in an uproar.
Gandalf: Hm. Well, now, that should please him.
Frodo: Half the Shire’s been invited!

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 26) Practically everybody living near was invited…

Gandalf: Good gracious me!
Frodo: He’s up to something.
Gandalf: Hmm… oh really…
Frodo: All right then, keep your secrets. (Gandalf laughs) Before you came along, we Bagginses were very well thought of.

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 75) Pippin: ‘All right, cousin Frodo! You can keep your secret for the present, if you want to be mysterious.’

Gandalf: Indeed.
Frodo: Never had any adventures or did anything unexpected.

The Hobbit 15) …People considered them very respectable. … but also because they never had any adventures or did anything unexpected.

Extended Edition
Bilbo Baggins’s voice: (clears his throat) The twenty-second day of September. The year 1400 …by the Shire reckoning…Bag End. Bagshot Row. Hobbiton. Westfarthing – the Shire … Middle-earth. The Third Age of this world…
Bilbo sits at his desk in his sunlit Bag End study, lettering in a large book as the words are spoken.
(As he writes:) ‘There and Back Again – A Hobbit’s Tale. By Bilbo Baggins.’ Now – where to begin? (he turns a page, and pauses a moment to puff on his pipe as he considers.) Ah, yes. (He dips his quill and writes on) ‘Concerning Hobbits. Hobbits have been living and farming in the four Farthings of the Shire for many hundreds of years, quite content to ignore and be ignored by the world of the Big Folk, Middle-earth being, after all, full of strange creatures beyond count. Hobbits are a secretive people. We are not renowned as great warriors, nor counted among the very wise.’ (Chuckles. There is a knock on the door. He calls out) Frodo! There’s someone at the door! ‘In fact, it has been remarked by some that Hobbits’ only real passion is for food. An unfair observation, as we have also developed a keen interest in the brewing of ales and the smoking of pipeweed. But where our hearts truly lie is in peace, and quiet, and good tilled earth. For all Hobbits share a love for things that grow. (Sam is seen gardening – outside a hobbit-hole with a yellow door – his home?) And yes, no doubt to others our ways seem quaint … (A field is being decorated with banners, awnings, and streamers; he chuckles) But today of all days, it is brought home to me: it is no bad thing to celebrate a simple life!’ (Several hobbits are raising a yellow banner that reads ‘Happy Birthday Bilbo Baggins’. When the banner stays up, the hobbits applaud.)

Prologue 1) Further information will also be found in the selection from the Red Book of Westmarch that has already been published, under the title of The Hobbit. That story was derived from the earlier chapters of the Red Book, composed by Bilbo himself … and called by him There and Back Again….
Prologue Title 1): Concerning Hobbits
Prologue
1) Hobbits are an unobtrusive but very ancient people; more numerous formerly than they are today, for they love peace and quiet and good tilled earth…
Prologue 1) Even in ancient days they were, as a rule, shy of ‘the Big Folk’.
Prologue 2) Yet it is clear that Hobbits had, in fact, lived quietly in Middle-earth for many long years before other folk became even aware of them. And the world after all being full of strange creatures beyond count, these little people seemed of very little importance. But in the days of Bilbo, and of Frodo his heir, they suddenly became, by no wish of their own, both important and renowned, and troubled the counsels of the Wise and the Great.
Prologue: Of Pipeweed 7) There is another astonishing thing about Hobbits of old that must be mentioned, an astonishing habit: they imbibed or inhaled, through pipes of clay or wood, the smoke of the burning leaves of a herb, which they called pipe-weed or leaf.

There is another knock on the door, insistent. Bilbo sighs disgustedly.
Bilbo: Frodo! The door!
There is no response from Frodo, but there is another knock.
Bilbo: Sticklebacks, where is that boy? Frodo!
Frodo Baggins is sitting against a tree, straw in his mouth, reading a book.
A deep voice humming and singing comes in earshot. Frodo looks up from his book, looks around as if trying to be sure of what he is hearing. The words become clearer.
Gandalf (singing): Down from the door where it began… (His voice trails off to humming, then sings again) And I must follow if I can…
Frodo jumps to his feet, taking the straw out of his mouth as he does so. He grins, and eagerly begins to run.
Gandalf (Sings):
The Road goes ever on and on,
Down from the door where it began,
Now far ahead the road has gone,
And I must follow if I can.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 35) Bilbo:
The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 24) At the end of the second week of September a cart came in through Bywater from the direction of the Brandywine Bridge in broad daylight. An old man was driving it all alone. He wore a tall pointed blue hat, a long grey cloak, and a silver scarf. He had a long white beard and bushy eyebrows that stuck out beyond the brim of his hat.

Frodo runs to the edge of the sunken road, to a point where he can intercept Gandalf. As the cart comes up to him, he speaks sternly, arms folded in front of him.
Frodo: You’re late.
Gandalf reins in and looks up slowly, and just as sternly, from under the wide brim of his blue hat.
Gandalf: A wizard is never late, Frodo Baggins. Nor is he early. He arrives precisely when he means to.
They both try to keep a straight face, but both fail and both laugh richly. Frodo leaps onto the wagon, arms outstretched to embrace his old friend.
Frodo: It’s wonderful to see you, Gandalf!
Gandalf (laughing, holds him tight for a moment): You didn’t think I’d miss your Uncle Bilbo’s birthday? (As they drive on together) So how is the old rascal? I hear it’s going to be a party of special magnificence.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 21) … Mr. Bilbo Baggins of Bag End announced that he would shortly be celebrating his eleventy-first birthday with a party of special magnificence.
Frodo: You know Bilbo. He’s got the whole place in an uproar.
Gandalf: Hm. Well, now, that should please him.
Frodo: Half the Shire’s been invited! And the rest of them are turning up anyway.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 26) Practically everybody living near was invited. A very few were overlooked by accident, but as they turned up all the same, that did not matter.

They both laugh. The cart moves past a golden field where three hobbits work; a woman shades her eyes to watch them go by.
Bilbo’s voice: ‘And so life in the Shire goes on, very much as it has this past Age, full of its own comings and goings, with change coming slowly – if it comes at all. For things are made to endure in the Shire, passing from one generation to the next. There’s always been a Baggins living here, under the Hill, in Bag End.’ (Speaks softly) And there always will be.
Frodo: To tell you the truth, Bilbo’s been a bit odd lately. (Gandalf looks over at him) I mean – more than usual. He’s taken to locking himself in his study. He spend hours and hours poring over old maps when he thinks I’m not looking.
In Bag End, Bilbo is doing just that; he puts an old map aside – not what he was looking for. With a sigh, he drops his hands to his sides in an exasperated gesture, then feels at his trouser pocket. Both hands plunge into his pockets, searching in them urgently – there is nothing there. His breath becomes short.
Bilbo: Where has it gone?!
He checks under the cushion of his desk chair, moves the chair to look on the floor, goes out into the hallway to check a garment draped over a chair, picks up and throws down pack near the wall, takes down a coat from a peg and rifles through it – throws it down as well. His upset is growing – then his hand happens to brush against his right waistcoat pocket. He pats it – catches his breath as he reaches into it and pulls out something small enough to be hidden in his hand. With a long, relieved exhalation, he closes his fingers around the thing and puts his hand up to his face, as relieved as though he had thought he had lost something vital to his existence.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 34) ‘I am always …wondering if it is safe, and pulling it out to make sure. I tried locking it up, but I found I couldn’t rest without it in my pocket.’
Frodo: He’s up to something. (Gandalf looks at him sidelong, then away at the scenery with patently false innocence) All right then, keep your secrets.

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 75) Pippin: ‘All right, cousin Frodo! You can keep your secret for the present, if you want to be mysterious.’

Gandalf: What?
Frodo: I know you have something to do with it!
Gandalf: Good gracious me!
Frodo: Before you came along, we Bagginses were very well thought of.
Gandalf: Indeed.
Frodo: Never had any adventures or did anything unexpected.

The Hobbit 15) people considered them very respectable. … but also because they never had any adventures or did anything unexpected.

Gandalf: If you’re referring to the incident with the dragon, I was barely involved. All I did was give your uncle a little nudge out of the door.
Frodo: Whatever you did, you’ve been officially labelled a disturber of the peace.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 40) Gandalf: ‘They say I am a nuisance and a disturber of the peace.’

Gandalf: (mutters around his pipestem as he puffs on it) Oh, really?
An older hobbit working in his garden sees Gandalf, and looks up at him rather sourly. His wife comes from the house with an even more displeased face. Hobbit children come running to the road through the fields, and gather calling after the cart, which increases the older Hobbits’ indignation.
Hobbit children: Gandalf! Gandalf’s here!! GanDALF! Fireworks, Gandalf… Gandalf! Fireworks, Gandalf…
The cart continues away with not a single squib or cracker forthcoming.
Hobbit children: Ohhhh…
Frodo looks up at Gandalf with an expression not very different from the children’s. Gandalf stares straight ahead, but in a moment, a small burst of spiraling fireworks erupts from the back of the cart. The children jump up and down and cheer. Frodo smiles knowingly up at Gandalf, who is chuckling with delight. The hobbit farmer is also laughing – until his extremely unamused wife shoots him a quelling look. He subsides.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 24) Small hobbit-children ran after the cart all through Hobbiton and right up the hill. It had a cargo of fireworks, as they rightly guessed…
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 25) …The old man smiled. They knew him by sight … but not a single squib or cracker was forthcoming, to the disappointment of the onlookers.

Frodo: (Stands up in the wagon) Gandalf – I’m glad you’re back.
Gandalf: So am I, dear boy. (Frodo hops down. Gandalf continues, quietly to himself, around his pipe as he looks around him contentedly) So am I.
Gandalf continues on to pull up in front of Bag End. He goes through a gate, which has a sign on it reading ‘No admittance except on party business’, and goes up to knock on the round green door with his staff.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party p. 26) A notice appeared on the gate at Bag End: NO ADMITTANCE EXCEPT ON PARTY BUSINESS.
Bilbo (from within): No, thank you! We don’t want any more visitors, well-wishers, or distant relations!
Gandalf (calls): And what about very old friends?
Bilbo opens the door and stands there, almost disbelieving.
Bilbo: Gandalf?
Gandalf: Bilbo Baggins.
Laughing happily, moved almost to the point of tears at the sight of Gandalf, Bilbo goes to the wizard, who kneels down to embrace him.
Bilbo: My dear Gandalf!
Gandalf: Good to see you. One hundred and eleven years old. Who would believe it? (He holds Bilbo back to look into his face.) You haven’t aged a day. (The realization gives him a moment’s pause, but in another moment they are both laughing again.)

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 22) Time wore on, but it seemed to have little effect on Mr. Baggins. At ninety he was much the same as at fifty. At ninety-nine they began to call him well-preserved; but unchanged would have been nearer the mark.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past45) Gandalf: ‘You look the same as ever, Frodo!’

Bilbo: Come on, come in! Welcome, welcome. (He leads Gandalf into the hole; Gandalf takes off his hat as he enters. Bilbo shuts the door behind him. Mutters as he latches the door) Oh, here we are. (He takes Gandalf’s stick and hat.) Tea? Or maybe something a little stronger. I’ve got a few of bottles of the Old Winyards left. 1296. Very good year. Almost as old as I am. (chuckles) It was laid down by my father. What’s say we open one, eh?

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 37) Old Winyards: a strong red wine from the Southfarthing, and now quite mature, as it had been laid down by Bilbo’s father.

With something of an effort he sets hat and staff down at the end of the entry hall, and keeps talking, calling back as he potters off to the kitchen.
Gandalf: Just tea, thank you. Gandalf takes a step backward into a hanging light fixture. He ducks back under it, steadies its swinging, and unfortunately moves away and turns at the same time, which brings his forehead sharply against a low (for him) ceiling beam. Ohh… It obviously hurt, but even this makes him laugh.
Bilbo (continuing from a room or two away, sometimes barely audible as he goes back and forth): I was expecting you sometime last week. Not that it matters. You come and go as you please. Always have done, always will. You caught me a bit unprepared, I’m afraid. We’ve only got some cold chicken and a bit of pickle… There’s some cheese. Oh no, that won’t do. We’ve got raspberry jam, an apple tart… But not much for afters. Oh, no, we’re all right. I’ve just found some sponge cake.

Book 3: Chapter VII – Helm’s Deep 516) Háma: ‘Ever [Gandalf] goes and comes unlooked-for.’

As Bilbo natters on, Gandalf ducks under the beam, and enters a cozy study/living room. He picks up a worn, somewhat tattered framed map, which prominently features the Lonely Mountain, with a Red Dragon flying over its peak. Appendices: NOTE ON THE MAPS – They consisted of a general map of the western regions of Middle-earth… printed in red and black on large folded sheets…
Bilbo (coming into the outer room): I can make you some eggs if you li– Ganda- Gandalf? (He stops in puzzlement when he doesn’t see Gandalf.)
Gandalf (poking his head around a doorway): Just tea, thank you.

The Hobbit 24) Gandalf: ‘Tea! No thank you! A little red wine, I think, for me.’
‘And raspberry jam and apple tart,’ said Bifur.
‘And mince-pies and cheese,’ said Bofur.
‘And pork pie and salad,’ said Bombur.
‘And more cakes – and ale – and coffee, if you don’t mind,’ called the other dwarves. …
‘Put on a few eggs, there’s a good fellow,’ Gandalf called after him… ‘And just bring out the cold chicken and pickles!’

Bilbo: Oh, right. (Crams some cake in his mouth, and mumbles indistinctly): You don’t mind if I do, do you?
Gandalf: No, not at all.
Bilbo almost chokes, and reels back against the wall as a harsh female voice comes from outside, accompanied by a loud banging at the door.
Lobelia: Bilbo! Bilbo Baggins. (She bangs on door more loudly)
Bilbo: I’m not at home!

Title – The Hobbit chapter 22: Not at Home

Bilbo tiptoes to peek out the window beside the door.
Bilbo (hisses): It’s the Sackville-Bagginses!
Lobelia: I know you’re in there!
Bilbo: They want the house! They’ve never forgiven me for living this long!

I’ve got to get away from these confounded relatives, hanging on the bell all day, never giving me a moment’s peace. I want to see mountains again, mountains, Gandalf. And then find somewhere quiet where I can finish my book… Oh – tea!

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 23) Gaffer: ‘[Those Sackville-Bagginses] thought they were going to get Bag End .. the S-B’s won’t never see the inside of Bag End now, or it is to be hoped not.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past67) [Lobelia] had been obliged to wait about seventy-seven years longer for Bag End than she once hoped.

Gandalf (sits at the table): So you mean to go through with your plan, then?
Bilbo: Yes, yes, it’s all in hand. All the arrangements are made.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 25) Gandalf: ‘You mean to go on with your plan, then?’
‘I do. I made up my mind months ago, and I haven’t changed it.’

With both hands Bilbo brings the kettle from the kitchen fire to the table. Gandalf takes the lid from the teapot for Bilbo to pour the water in.
Bilbo: Oh, thank you.
Gandalf: Frodo suspects something.
Bilbo (A bit indignant, a bit proud): ‘Course he does. He’s a Baggins! Not some blockheaded Bracegirdle from Hardbottle.

Book 6: Chapter IX – The Grey Havens 998) “[Lobelia] gave [Bag End] back to Frodo, and went to her own people, the Bracegirdles of Hardbottle.”

Gandalf: You will tell him, won’t you?
Bilbo (impatiently): Yes, yes.
Gandalf: He’s very fond of you.
Bilbo (more quietly): I know. He’d probably come with me if I asked him. I think in his heart, Frodo’s still in love with the Shire. The woods, the fields. Little rivers. (He has the thumb and forefinger of his right hand tucked into the small pocket of his waistcoat. Gandalf takes notice of this as Bilbo comes back across the room to sit across from him. Bilbo goes on to speak more seriously than he has before.) I’m old, Gandalf. I know I don’t look it, but I’m beginning to feel it in my heart. I feel thin. Sort of stretched, like butter, scraped over too much bread. I need a holiday. A very long holiday. And I don’t expect I shall return. In fact, I mean not to.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 25) Bilbo: ‘I think I need a holiday.’
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party
32) ‘Are you going any further?’
‘Yes, I am. I feel I need a holiday, a very long holiday, as I have told you before. Probably a permanent holiday: I don’t expect I shall return. In fact, I don’t mean to, and I have made all the arrangements.
‘I am old, Gandalf. I don’t look it, but I am beginning to feel it in my heart of hearts. Well-preserved, indeed!’ he snorted. ‘Why I feel all thin, sort of stretched, if you know what I mean: like butter that has been scraped over too much bread. … I want to see mountains again, Gandalf- mountains; and then find somewhere that I can rest. In peace and quiet, without a lot of relatives prying around, and a string of confounded visitors hanging on the bell. I might find somewhere where I can finish my book. …’
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 32) ‘He would come with me, of course, if I asked him. …he is still in love with the Shire, with woods and fields and little rivers. …’

That evening, Bilbo and Gandalf sit in front of Bag End with their pipes, looking down the hill at the party field. The area is ringed with lights, and several tents glow cheerily.
Bilbo: Old Toby. The finest weed in the Southfarthing.

Prologue: Of Pipeweed 8) Herblore of the Shire, by Meriadoc Brandybuck: ‘Tobold Hornblower of Longbottom in the Southfarthing first true pipe-weed….The best home-grown still comes from that district, especially the varieties now known as Longbottom Leaf, Old Toby, and Southern Star.”….’

Bilbo blows a smoke-ring, and watches sideways, expectantly, as Gandalf puffs out a cloud of smoke himself. The wizard’s puff quickly forms into a small ship, swan-bowed, with a high stern and three sails, which glides through Bilbo’s expanding smoke-ring.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past45) [Gandalf] smoked and blew smoke-rings with the same vigour and delight.
The Hobbit 25) [Thorin] was blowing the most enormous smoke-rings, and wherever he told one to go, it would … but wherever it went it was not quick enough to escape Gandalf. Pop! He sent a smaller smoke-ring from his short clay-pipe straight through each one of Thorin’s.

Bilbo (well satisfied): Gandalf, my old friend…. this will be a night to remember.
Fireworks begin to go off – 27) There were green trees with trunks of dark smoke: their leaves opened like a whole spring unfolding in a moment, and their shining branches dropped glowing flowers down upon the astonished hobbits, disappearing with a sweet scent just before they touched their upturned faces. Everyone cheers. Hobbits are forming up for dancing – including Frodo, one of the first ones up. Others are already well into their drinking. Sam is watching the dancing, but turns away quickly as a very pretty girl dances nearer to him.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 27) There were songs, dances, music, games, and, of course, food and drink.
Bilbo greets and works the crowd like an aristocratic politician.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 26) Bilbo met the guests (and additions) at the new white gate in person.
Bilbo: Hello, hello. Fatty Bolger. Lovely to see you. Welcome, welcome!
Frodo (falls on the bench next to Sam): Go on, Sam, ask Rosie for a dance!
Sam: Um. I think I’ll just have another ale.
He stands up and starts to move away from the dancers.
Frodo: Oh, no you don’t! Go on!
He seizes Sam from behind, and with impeccable aim propels him into the dance. Before he knows it Sam has his arm around Rosie and her hand in his, and they’re off around the circle with barely a pause. Frodo laughs. Meanwhile, Gandalf lights off another rocket with his staff. 27) …There was a forest of silver spears that sprang suddenly into the air with a yell like an embattled army…
The guest of honour is sitting before a small crowd of young Hobbit children, who listen enthralled as, with great panache, he tells them a true story. Gandalf takes a few moments from the fireworks to dance.
Bilbo: So there I was, at the mercy of three monstrous trolls. And they were all arguing amongst themselves about how they were going to cook us. Whether it be turned on a spit, or whether they should sit on us one by one, squash us, to jelly.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 28) Sometimes, after a glass or two, [Bilbo] would allude to the absurd adventures of his mysterious journey.
The Hobbit 50) ..with three angry trolls … sitting by them, arguing whether they should roast them slowly or mince them fine and boil them, or just sit on them one by one and squash them to jelly.

The smallest children gasp.
Bilbo: And they spent so much time arguing the whithertos and the whyfors that the sun’s first light crept over the top of the trees -poof- (the children gasp and jump) And turned them all to stone!

The Hobbit 51) “Dawn take you all, and be stone to you!” said a voice that sounded like William’s. But it wasn’t. … William never spoke, for he stood turned to stone as he stooped, and Bert and Tom were stuck like rocks as they looked at him.
Book 1: Chapter XII – Flight to the Ford 196) [Frodo] recalled Bilbo’s account of his journey … in the country near the Troll’s wood where his first serious adventure had happened.
Book 1: Chapter XII – Flight to the Ford 200) [Pippin] knew the story well. Bilbo and Frodo had told it often.

Gandalf, laughing and clearly having the time of his life, takes four more fireworks from his wagon. As he leaves, Merry comes out from behind the cart, and thumps the side of the tent beside it. Pippin ducks out.
Pippin (whispers): Quickly!
Merry gives Pippin a leg up onto the wagon, tossing him up among the fireworks, and glances back to keep an eye on Gandalf. They are in no danger from the wizard; he’s having a grand time releasing fiery butterflies for a group of Hobbit children, who run off to chase them as he watches, chuckling.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 27) The fireworks were by Gandalf: they were not only brought by him, but designed and made by him; and the special effects, set pieces, and flights of rockets were let off by him. …There were fountains of butterflies that flew glittering into the trees.
Gandalf: Oh! Up they go!
Pippin holds up a cracker.
Merry: No, no, the big one, big one!
Pippin picks up another, very much bigger, and smiles onto the face of the red dragon at its top. Merry gasps in happy awe: perfect! Pippin jumps down and scurries behind the tent. Merry, trying to look casual (and failing), takes another hasty look around, a quick bite of apple, and bolts after Pippin.
Another of the (official) rockets goes up. Bilbo greets more guests, including a dark-haired Hobbit lady with a small girl on her hip and a milling crowd of children around her. .
Bilbo: Mrs. Bracegirdle, how nice to see you, welcome, welcome! (at least seven more children swarm past) Are all these children yours?
Mrs. Bracegirdle: Mm, yes.
Bilbo (impressed): Good gracious. You have been productive!
She tends to agree. As Bilbo stands for a moment of calm in his duties as host, his ear suddenly twitches, and he sneaks a glance to the side. Frodo comes up just then, and Bilbo clutches at him, pointing to his ear .
Lobelia (not yet seeing him): Bilbo!
Bilbo (hisses): S-Sackville-Bagginses! Quickly! Hide!
They duck around the corner of a tent; Frodo turns his face away, and Bilbo pulls the lapel of his coat up over his face. The Sackville-Bagginses – a middle-aged woman with a face that would curdle new milk and a man looking equally sour – move on without spotting them.
Bilbo: Oh – Thank you, my boy. You’re a good lad, Frodo. … I am … very selfish, you know… Yes, I am. Very selfish. I don’t know why I took you in after your mother and father died, but it wasn’t out of charity. I think it was because of all my numerous relations you were the one Baggins that showed real spirit.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 21) When Bilbo was ninety-nine he adopted Frodo as his heir, and brought him to live at Bag End, and the hopes of the Sackville-Bagginses were finally dashed.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 21) The eldest of [his cousins], and Bilbo’s favorite, was young Frodo Baggins.
‘You had better come and live here, Frodo my lad,’ said Bilbo one day; ‘and then we can celebrate our birthday-parties comfortably together.’
Book 1: Chapter VIII – Fog on the Barrow-downs 137) …Though [Frodo] did not know it, Bilbo (and Gandalf) had thought him the best hobbit in the Shire.
(Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 258) Elrond: ‘I have known few hobbits, save Bilbo here; and it seems to me that he is perhaps not so alone and singular as I had thought him.’)

Frodo: Bilbo, have you been at the Gaffer’s homebrew?
Bilbo: No! Well, yes, but th-that’s not the point. The point is, Frodo… (He looks intensely at Frodo, but then the impulse to continue drains away. His eyes drop.) …You’ll be all right.
He turns aside and takes a deep draught from his mug.

Inside a tent, Pippin lights the wick as Merry holds the top.
Pippin: Done.
Merry: You’re supposed to stick it in the ground. (Pushes the dragon to Pippin.)
Pippin: It is in the ground. (Pushes it back to Merry.)
Merry: Outside… (Passes the dragon back to Pippin.)
Pippin: This was your idea!
He pushes the dragon over to Merry again, and as Merry is in the process of returning it once again, the fuse runs out. The firework ignites, and whooshes upward, taking the tent with it. Merry and Pippin are both knocked to the ground, and Pippin shrieks like a girl. As the rocket rises, Hobbits cry out and point; the fireball continues to rise and, crackling, begins to take shape. But this initial delight changes to alarm as it turns and begins a dive directly toward them, very much dragon shaped and impressive.
Frodo is following Bilbo as he makes his way through the crowd; he looks up, and sees what the commotion is about. Not having seen the initial launch of the rocket, is first thought is for…
Frodo: Bilbo…
He turns, and grabs Bilbo, who hasn’t looked up yet.
Frodo: Bilbo, watch out for the dragon!
Bilbo: Dragon? Nonsense, there hasn’t been a dragon in these parts for a thousand years!

(Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 43) Ted Sandyman: ‘There’s only one Dragon in Bywater, and that’s Green.’)

Bilbo seems a bit put out to be hustled along by Frodo, and the word ‘years’ is on a rising inflection as Frodo pushes/pulls him down on the ground. The dragon swooshes just above them and the other 100+ Hobbits lying prone, flies out over the lake, and as the hobbits watch fearfully, explodes into starbursts that fill the sky. Relieved hobbits cheer and applaud.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 27) Out flew a red-golden dragon – not life-size, but terribly life-like: fire came from his jaws, his eyes glared down; there was a roar, and he whizzed three times over the heads of the crowd. They all ducked, and many fell flat on their faces. The dragon passed like an express train, turned a somersault, and burst over Bywater with a deafening explosion.
Hobbits: Oh!
They cheer. Merry and Pippin stand together in supreme, if very sooty, fulfillment.
Merry (with deep satisfaction): That was good!
Pippin: Let’s get another one.
Hands come down and seize each of them by an ear. Two pained, soot-covered faces look up at their captor: Gandalf.
Gandalf: Meriadoc Brandybuck and Peregrin Took. I might have known.
Though still otherwise quite filthy, Merry and Pippin now have very clean hands: Gandalf has set them to washing dishes. Pippin scrubs a mug in a barrel of soapy water as Merry caries a stack of plates – not his first – to set down on a table next to Gandalf. The wizard, sipping from a Hobbit-sized mug and smoking his pipe, does not appear to be taking his eyes off the miscreants.
The hobbit crowd: Speech, Bilbo! Speech!
Merry pauses to look over, and even Gandalf’s attention is diverted.
Frodo: Speech!
Bilbo takes a last swig from a mug, and walks over to take up a position in front of the crowd under the Party Tree.
Bilbo: My dear Bagginses and Boffins! (The crowd cheers) Tooks and Brandybucks! (Cheers) Grubbs! (Cheers) Chubbs! (Cheers) Hornblowers! (Cheers) Bolgers! (Cheers) Bracegirdles! And Proudfoots!
Proudfoot: Proudfeet!
It’s our farmer from earlier, with both feet on the table.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party p. 29) Bilbo: My dear Bagginses and Boffins! He began again. And my dear Tooks and Brandybucks, and Grubbs, and Chubbs, and Burrowses, and Hornblowers, and Bolgers, Bracegirdles, Goodbodies, Brockhouses and Proudfoots! ‘ProudFEET’ shouted an elderly hobbit from the back of the pavilion. His name, of course, was Proudfoot, and well merited; his feet were large, exceptionally furry, and both were on the table.

Bilbo: Today is my one hundred and eleventh birthday!

Today is my one hundred and eleventh birthday: I am eleventy-one today!

Cheers from the crowd.
Hobbit in the crowd: Happy Birthday!
Bilbo: Alas. Eleventy one years is far too short a time to live amongst such excellent, and admirable hobbits.
There is a tremendous outburst of approval.
I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like, and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve.
There is a pause, and scattered clapping as they try to work it out. Someone in the crowd says ‘What?’
I … I have things to do.

…and that eleventy-one years is too short a time to live among such excellent and admirable hobbits. Tremendous outburst of approval. I don’t know half of you half as well as I should like, and I like less than half of you half as well as you deserve. … There was some scattered clapping, but most of them were trying to work it out and see if it came to a compliment.

Bilbo slips his hand into his pocket and brings it out closed over something, then clasps both hands behind his back, fingering a gold ring in his right.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 31) …Even while he was making his speech, he had been fingering the golden ring in his pocket.
(Distracted, almost to himself) I’ve put this off for far too long. (Loud and clear) I regret to announce this is the end. I’m going now. I bid you all a very fond farewell. (More softly, looking down straight at Frodo) Goodbye.
He vanishes.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 30) I wish to make an ANNOUNCEMENT. He spoke this last word so loudly and suddenly that everyone sat up who still could. I regret to announce that – though, as I said, eleventy-one years is far too short a time to spend among you – this is the END. I am going. I am leaving NOW.GOOD-BYE!’
He stepped down and vanished.

The crowd gasps, and then begins talking again almost at once.
Away from the party, Hobbits can be heard calling Bilbo’s name; there is a soft sound of footsteps going up the steps of Bag End, and the round green door opens, shuts again. Bilbo reappears (with his shadow), holding the ring he has clearly just removed and laughing. He flips the ring jauntily into the air, catches it, and returns it to his coat pocket, patting it. Humming to himself, he picks up a stick from the stand, seems to measure it up, and bustles into the living room carrying a pair of candles.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 31) He then went into his study, and from a large strong-box took out a leather-bound manuscript, and also a large bulky envelope …
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 35) Bilbo chose his favorite stick from the stand.

Gandalf: I suppose you think that was terribly clever.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 31) Gandalf: ‘I suppose you feel that everything has gone off splendidly and according to plan.’

Bilbo starts, turns full circle before he sees Gandalf, looking rather stern.
Bilbo: Come on Gandalf, did you see their faces! (Packs the candles)
Gandalf: There are many magic rings in this world, Bilbo Baggins, and none of them should be used lightly!

(Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 33) ‘Magic rings are – well, magical.’ )

Bilbo: It was just a bit of fun… Oh, you’re probably right, as usual… (Goes and takes his long-stemmed pipe from the mantelpiece) You will keep an eye on Frodo, won’t you?
Gandalf: Two eyes, as often as I can spare them.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 25) ‘Anyway I mean to enjoy myself on Thursday, and have my little joke.’
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 31) ‘I expect you know best, as usual.’
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 32) ‘You’ll keep an eye on Frodo, won’t you?
‘Two eyes, as often as I can spare them.’

Bilbo goes over to a shelf by the window and takes up a thick red-covered book.
Bilbo: I’m leaving everything to him.
Gandalf: What about this ring of yours, is that staying too?
Bilbo packs the pipe and book.
Bilbo: Yes, yes. It’s in an envelope over there, on the mantelpiece… No, wait it’s – here in my pocket. (Abstractedly takes the ring out and turns it in his fingers.) Why – isn’t that – isn’t that odd, now. (He laughs a little, but then his face changes) Yet after all that, why not. (Quietly) Why shouldn’t I keep it?
Gandalf: I think you should leave the ring behind, Bilbo. Is that so hard?
Bilbo turns quickly to look up at him, making an effort to be casual.
Bilbo: Well no… And yes. (It comes out almost a hiss. He turns away, and his voice becomes heated.) Now it comes to it, I don’t feel like parting with it. It’s mine! I found it! It came to me!

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 32) ‘…little rivers. … I am leaving everything to him, of course.’
‘Everything?’ said Gandalf. The ring as well? You agreed to that, you remember.’
‘Well, er, yes. I suppose so,’ stammered Bilbo.
‘Where is it?’
’In an envelope, if you must know,’ said Bilbo impatiently. ‘There on the mantelpiece. Well, no! Here it is in my pocket.’ He hesitated. ‘Isn’t that odd now?’ he said softly to himself. ‘Yet after all, why not? Why shouldn’t it stay there?
Gandalf looked again very hard at Bilbo, and there was a glint in his eyes. ‘I think, Bilbo,’ he said quietly, ‘I should leave it behind. Don’t you want to?’
‘Well, yes – and no. Now it comes to it, I don’t like parting with it at all, I may say. …’ A curious change came over his voice. It was sharp with suspicion and annoyance.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 33) ‘It is my own. I found it. It came to me.’

Gandalf: There’s no need to get angry.
Bilbo: Well if I’m angry, it’s your fault! … (Croons) It’s mine. My own. (Hisses) My precious. (He holds the ring before him, stroking along its edge, with a strange smile and a strange light in his eyes, which grow large)
Gandalf (looks stricken): Precious? It’s been called that before, but not by you.
Bilbo turns sharply back with a snarl.
Bilbo (furiously): Oh, what business is it of yours what I do with my own things?!
Gandalf: I think you’ve had that ring quite long enough.
Bilbo’s fists are balled, and he bounces up on his toes for a moment, ready for a fight.
Bilbo: You want it for yourself!!

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 33) Gandalf: ‘Also I think you have had it quite long enough.’
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 33) Bilbo flushed, and there was an angry light in his eyes. His kindly face grew hard. … ‘And what business is it of yours, to know what I do with my own things? It is my own. I found it. It came to me.’
‘Yes, yes,’ said Gandalf. ‘But there is no need to get angry.’
‘If I am angry, it is your fault,’ said Bilbo. ‘It is mine, I tell you! My own. My precious. Yes, my precious.’
The wizard’s eyes remained grave and attentive, and only a flicker in his deep eyes showed that he was startled and indeed alarmed. ‘It has been called that before,’ he said, ‘but not by you.’
… ‘Well, if you want my ring yourself, say so!’ cried Bilbo. … His hand strayed to the hilt of his small sword.

The room darkens around Gandalf, and he seems to grow very tall and menacing as his voice takes on an alarming depth and resonance. Bilbo staggers back to against the wall; a strong wind is blowing at him.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 33 …Gandalf’s eyes flashed .. he seemed to grow tall and menacing; his shadow filled the little room. … Bilbo backed away to the wall, breathing hard, his hand clutching at his pocket.
Gandalf (shouts): BILBO BAGGINS! DO NOT TAKE ME FOR SOME CONJUROR OF CHEAP TRICKS! I AM NOT TRYING TO ROB YOU!!
The light returns, and Gandalf returns to his proper size, becomes merely the old friend again.
I’m trying to help you.
Bilbo looks completely stricken. With a plaintive ‘Ohh,’ he goes forward to throw his arms around Gandalf’s waist. Gandalf holds him, stroking his hair a moment, then kneels to look him in the eyes, hands still on his shoulders.
All your long years, we’ve been friends. Trust me, as you once did, hmm? Let it go.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 34) ‘I am not trying to rob you, but to help you. I wish you’d trust me as you used.’ He turned away, and the shadow passed. He seemed to dwindle again to an old grey man, bent and troubled.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party
33) ‘Let it go. All your long life we have been friends, and you owe me something. Come! Do as you promised: give it up!’

Bilbo: You’re right, Gandalf. The ring must go to Frodo. (Picks up his staff and backpack and starts for the door) It’s late, the road is long… Yes, it is time…

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 34) ‘it goes to Frodo with all the rest.’

Bilbo opens the door and squares his shoulders, prepares to take that first step out.
Gandalf: Bilbo. (Bilbo stops) The ring is still in your pocket.
Bilbo (turning): Oh – yes.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 34) ‘You have still got the ring in your pocket,’ said the wizard.
‘Well, so I have!’ cried Bilbo.

He pulls it out of his pocket to hold on the palm of his hand. With a visible effort as he stares it down, he turns his hand, and it slides off to plummet to the floor. It hits the tiles with a metallic thump, and stays where it falls. He turns and runs the few steps outside, stopping not far from the door, breathing hard in the night air. Gandalf ducks out after him. Bilbo’s head comes up on one more deep breath.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 34) Bilbo took out the envelope, but … his hand jerked back, and the packet fell on the floor… A spasm of anger passed swiftly over the hobbit’s face again. Suddenly it gave way to a look of relief and a laugh.
Bilbo: I’ve thought up an ending for my book. (he turns around to look at Gandalf) ‘And he lived happily ever after, to the end of his days’
Gandalf (bending down): And I’m sure you will, my dear friend.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 32) ‘… where I can finish my book. I have thought of a nice ending for it: and he lived happily ever after to the end of his days.’
Gandalf laughed. ‘I hope he will. …’

Bilbo: Goodbye Gandalf.
Gandalf: Goodbye, dear Bilbo.
They clasp hands. Bilbo turns and goes down through his gate, and strides off down the path, singing.
Bilbo: The road goes ever on and on, etc.
Gandalf (Softly, to himself): Until our next meeting.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 35) ’Goodbye, Gandalf.’
…Gandalf remained for a while staring after him into the darkness. ‘Goodbye, my dear Bilbo – until our next meeting!’ he said softly and went back indoors.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 35) Bilbo:
The Road goes ever on and on
Down from the door where it began.
Now far ahead the Road has gone,
And I must follow, if I can,
Pursuing it with eager feet,
Until it joins some larger way
Where many paths and errands meet.
And whither then? I cannot say.

******************************************************************************************************************

Gandalf reenters the house, and stands looking down at the ring. Slowly he bends down to pick it up – but as his fingers come near it, there is a flashing vision of a lidless red eye wreathed in flame. He withdraws his hand. Sitting in a too-small chair near the hearth, he smokes with great concentration.
Voice of Bilbo: It’s mine. My own. My preciousss…
Gandalf (mutters, around his pipestem): Riddles in the dark…

The Hobbit: Title – Chapter 5

Frodo (from outside): Bilbo! (Frodo bursts in, leaving the door open behind him) Bilbo!
He nearly steps on the ring, and stoops to pick it up.
Gandalf (muttering): My precious… Precious…
Frodo (sees Gandalf; sadly-): He’s gone, hasn’t he?

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 35) Frodo came in soon afterwards, and found him sitting in the dark, deep in thought. ‘Has he gone?’

Gandalf does not reply, continuing to mutter to himself (‘My Precious…’), but exhales another cloud of smoke. Frodo comes in to stand beside Gandalf. The ring is cupped in the palm of his hand.
Frodo: He talked so long about leaving. I didn’t think he’d really do it… Gandalf?
Gandalf turns almost absentmindedly, to see the ring on Frodo’s palm. He smiles at Frodo, but it is not a very convincing smile.
Gandalf: Bilbo’s ring. He’s gone to stay with the Elves. He’s left you Bag End.
He holds out an envelope to Frodo, who puts the ring into it. Gandalf quickly takes the envelope back, closes it, and seals it firmly with red wax.
Along with all his possessions. The ring is yours now.
He hands the sealed envelope back to Frodo, who takes it, looking a bit bemused.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 35) ‘You are the master of Bag End now … He left a packet for you. There it is!’

(whispers) Put it somewhere out of sight.
Gandalf rushes toward the entry hall.
Frodo (following): Where are you going?
Gandalf (gathering his staff and hat): There are some things that I must see to.
Frodo: What things?
Gandalf: Questions. Questions that need answering.
Frodo (going after him): You’ve only just arrived. I don’t understand.
Gandalf stops and turns around.
Gandalf: Neither do I.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 40) ‘I don’t understand,’ said Frodo.
‘Neither do I.’ answered the wizard.
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 40) ‘I am going off at once: so this is good-bye for the present,’ he got up.
‘At once!’ cried Frodo….

He ducks under the chandelier to put his hand on Frodo’s shoulder.
Keep it secret. Keep it safe.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 36) ‘But keep it secret, and keep it safe!’

He leaves, shutting the door behind him, leaving Frodo looking at the envelope in his hand.
Barad-dûr, set amid rivers of molten flame. Roads and bridges are filled with the lights of torchbearers. The tower is swarming with figures, torches burn everywhere, and there is a smith noise of industry.
Gollum’s Voice (in agony): No! Shire! Baggins!

Prologue 12) His enemy’s cries of hate and despair: Thief, thief! Baggins! We hates it forever!

The huge Gates of Minas Morgul open, and from out of a sickly green light nine horsemen gallop out.
Gandalf is riding hard, but pauses on a hill where he can see in the far distance a red glow of flame in the black lands of Mordor. He is visibly alarmed. In Gondor, he makes his way in haste to a library, where he is led into a dusty, crowded, cluttered room by a black-robed man with a torch. His hat sitting beside him on a pile of books, Gandalf searches through dusty papers, scrolls, maps, and books. He sets his mug aside when he finally comes upon what he is looking for.
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 245) Gandalf: ‘Grudgingly [Lord Denethor] permitted me to search among his hoarded scrolls and books.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 246) ‘And Boromir, there lies in Minas Tirith still, unread I guess, by any save Saruman and myself since the kings failed, a scroll that Isildur made himself.’

Gandalf (reads): The year 3434, of the Second Age. Here follows the account of Isildur, High King of Gondor, and the finding of the Ring of Power.
It has come to me, the One Ring, which shall be an heirloom of my kingdom. All those who follow in my bloodline shall be bound to its fate, for I will risk no hurt to the Ring. It is precious to me, though I buy it with great pain… The markings upon the band begin to fade. The writing, which at first was as clear as red flame, has all but disappeared, a secret now that only fire can tell.

Appendix B 1059) The Second Age year 3434 The host of the Alliance crosses the Misty Mountains. Battle of Dagorlad and defeat of Sauron. Siege of Barad-dûr begins
SA Year 3441 Sauron overthrown by Elendil and Gil-galad, who perish. Isildur takes the One Ring. Sauron passes away and the Ringwraiths go into the shadows. The Second Age ends.
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 246) For this scroll concerns the Ring, and thus wrote Isildur therein:
The Great Ring shall go now to be an heirloom of the North Kingdom; but records of it shall be left in Gondor, where also dwell the heirs of Elendil, lest a time come when the memory of these great matters shall grow dim.
It was hot when I first took it, hot as a glede, and my hand was scorched, so that I doubt if ever again I shall be free of the pain of it. Yet even as I write it is cooled, and it seemeth to shrink, though it loseth neither its beauty nor its shape. Already the writing upon it, which at first was as clear as red flame, fadeth and is now only barely to be read. It is fashioned in an Elven script of Eregion, for they have no letters in Mordor for such subtle work, but the language is unknown to me. I deem it to be a tongue of the Black Land, since it is foul and uncouth. What evil it saith I do not know, but I trace here a copy of it lest it fade beyond recall. The Ring misseth, maybe, the heat of Sauron’s hand, which was black and yet burned like fire, and so Gil-galad was destroyed; and maybe were the gold made hot again, the writing would be refreshed. But for my part I will risk no hurt to this thing: of all the works of Sauron the only fair. It is precious to me, though I buy it with great pain…

Sauron’s finger with the Ring falls to the ground, and Isildur rolls over on to his side where he lies to stare at it. He picks it up, wondering, and crumbles the brittle finger to coarse powder. The shining Ring, with a mutter that may be Isildur, shrinks between his fingers. The fire of the lettering begins to gutter.
******************************************************************************************************************
A hobbit man is chopping wood in front of his house, his dog by him.
The dog suddenly turns at a sound and begins to bark. A shadow spreads to cover the small house. The dog is barking frantically, bouncing a little with it. The hobbit looks around to see what the commotion is about, and takes a few steps backward. The barking turns into a whine as a black horse with bloody hooves stops restlessly in front of the house. The dog backs quickly through the open door, whining and never taking its eyes from the apparition on the road. The black hooded head of the rider turns slowly toward the hobbit. Nothing can be seen of a face – only blackness.
Rider (in a hissing whisper): Ssshire. Baggins.
Farmer Maggot (obviously frightened, but standing his ground for the moment): There’s no Bagginses around here. They’re all up in Hobbiton. That way…

Book 1: Chapter IV – A Short Cut to Mushrooms 92) Maggot: ‘Well … he came riding on a big black horse in at the gate … and right up to my door. All black he was himself, too, and cloaked and hooded up, as if he did not want to be known. … When Grip came out, he took one sniff and let out a yell as if he had been stung: he put down his tail and bolted off howling. The black fellow sat quite still.
‘ “… Have you seen Baggins? ” he asked in a queer voice, and bent down towards me. I could not see any face, for his hood fell down so low, and I felt a sort of shiver down my back….
‘ “Be off!” I said. “There are no Bagginses here. You’re in the wrong part of the Shire. You had better go back to Hobbiton – but you can go by the road this time.”’
‘He gave a sort of a hiss. It might have been laughing, and it might not. Then he spurred his great horse …. And rode through the gate and up the lane towards the causeway like a bolt of thunder…’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 250) Gandalf quoting Radagast: ‘”I have been told that wherever they go the Riders ask for news of a land called Shire.”’

He points off down the road in the direction the rider was heading, and follows the dog’s excellent example by very quickly backing through his door, never looking away from the road. He closes the door hastily against the night as the Rider gallops off. The shadows show two more racing after.
******************************************************************************************************************
In Hobbiton, laughter and song are in the air.
Merry and Pippin are standing on a table, singing loudly with accompaniment from several others, including Frodo, who picks up five mugs of ale from the bar and dances in circles around their table. He deposits two mugs somewhere and continues around the table with the rest.
Merry and Pippin: Hey, ho, to the bottle I go
To heal my heart and drown my woe
Rain may fall and wind may blow
But there still be… many miles to go
Sweet is the sound of pouring rain
And the stream that falls from hill to plain
Better than rain or rippling brook

Pippin alone: Is a mug o’ beer inside this Took!

Book 1: Chapter IV – A Short Cut to Mushrooms 88) Frodo, Sam, and Pippin:
Ho! ho! ho! To the bottle I go
To heal my heart and drown my woe
Though rain may fall and wind may blow,
And many miles be still to go,
Under a tall tree I will lie,
And let the clouds go sailing by…

Book 1: Chapter V – A Conspiracy Unmasked 99) Pippin:
O! Sweet is the sound of falling rain,
And the brook that leaps from hill to plain;
But better than rain or rippling streams
Is Water Hot that smokes and steams!

They and their audience laugh.
Sam sits at a table with his Gaffer, Ted Sandyman, and another old hobbit man. All four puff away on their pipes. Sam sits silent, oddly distracted as the others discuss events.
Old Man: There’s been some strange folk crossing the Shire. Dwarves, and others of a less than savoury nature…
Gaffer: War is brewing.
Old Man: The mountains are fair teeming with goblins.
Sam is staring off toward the bar… the pretty barmaid, Rosie, catches his eye as she dries a mug, and smiles. Abashed, Sam looks down. A barrel behind her bears the label “The Golden Perch”.
Book 1: Chapter IV – A Short Cut to Mushrooms 86) Pippin: ‘I had counted on passing The Golden Perch at Stock before sundown: the best beer in the Eastfarthing, or it used to be…’
Sandyman: Far off tales and children’s stories, that’s all that is! You’re beginning to sound like that old Bilbo Baggins! Cracked, he was…
Gaffer (seeing Frodo approaching out of the corner of his eye): And young Mr. Frodo here – he’s crackin’!
Frodo comes to sit at the end of the table with a pair of mugs, in high spirits (in more ways than one).
Frodo: And proud of it! Cheers, Gaffer!
He slides a tankard down the table to the old Hobbit, along with another to Sam. Sam catches it and lifts it to take a drink without ever taking his eyes from the bar.
Gaffer: Aye, cheers!
Sandyman: Well, it’s none of our concern what goes on beyond our borders. Keep your nose out of trouble, and no trouble’ll come to you!
Frodo lifts his mug in half-mocking agreement and drinks with a grin.

Prologue 10) At the time when this story begins the Bounders, as they were called, had been greatly increased. There were many reports of complaints of strange persons and creatures prowling about the borders.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past42-3) There were rumours of strange things happening in the world outside …Away far east and south there were wars and growing fear.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past43) ‘Queer things you do hear these days, to be sure,’ said Sam.
‘Ah,’ said Ted, ‘you do, if you listen. But I can hear fireside tales and children’s stories at home, if I want to.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past44) ‘All the same,’ said Sam, ‘you can’t deny that others…have seen queer folk crossing the Shire – crossing it, mind you: there are others that are turned back at the borders. ….
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past42) There were, however, dwarves on the road in unusual numbers.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past44) Re Frodo and Bilbo: ‘Oh, they’re both cracked,’ said Ted. ‘Leastways old Bilbo was cracked, and Frodo’s cracking.’
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 21) ‘It isn’t natural, and trouble will come of it!’
Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 24) The Gaffer: ‘Don’t go getting mixed up in the business of your betters, or you’ll land in trouble too big for you, I says to him…’

Frodo and Sam are leaving the Green Dragon Inn. In the doorway, drying another cup, is Rosie Cotton.
Rosie (smiling): ‘Night, lads.
Frodo: Good night.
Sam leaves with a little smile on his face.
The hobbit leaving behind them feels the need to be more eloquent.
Hobbit (going to one knee before Rosie): Good night, sweet maiden of the golden ale!
Frodo and Sam pause to look back to see Rosie laughing, then continue on.
Sam (mutters): Oi, mind who you’re sweet-talking…
Frodo: Don’t worry, Sam, Rosie knows an idiot when she sees one!
Sam (stopping and looking after Frodo in great concern): Does she?

Frodo and Sam walk together down the road (Sam weaving slightly), and at Bag End Frodo turns aside.
Frodo: Good night, Sam.
Sam: Good night, Mr. Frodo.
******************************************************************************************************************
While Sam continues on his way home, Frodo enters a dark Bag End, leaving the door open behind him. A window is also open in the study, and a breeze is sending papers fluttering. Abruptly cautious, Frodo quietly moves into the dark room, trying to see if there is anything amiss. A hand quite suddenly comes out of the dark behind him to clamp on the shoulder – with a gasp he spins. It is Gandalf, looking disheveled and wild.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past45) But secretly he thought that Gandalf looked older and more careworn.
Gandalf: Is it secret? Is it safe?
Frodo opens a painted trunk and begins rummaging among scrolls and papers. As he searches, Gandalf hears something outside and jumps, spins, staff at the ready and held as a weapon.
Frodo: Ah.
Successful, Frodo holds up the envelope into which Gandalf sealed the ring. In the same second, Gandalf snatches it from his hand and throws it into the fire.
Frodo (in dismay): What are you doing?

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past48) To Frodo’s astonishment and distress the wizard threw it suddenly into the middle of a glowing corner of the fire. Frodo gave a cry and groped for the tongs.

Gandalf does not answer, but stays ready with tongs as the envelope burns away. When the paper is all but gone, he reaches into the fire to pick up the ring with the tongs.
Gandalf (staring at the ring): Hold out your hand, Frodo. It’s quite cool.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past49) For a moment the wizard stood looking at the fire, then he stooped and removed the ring from the hearth with the tongs, and at once picked it up. Frodo gasped. ‘It is quite cool,’ said Gandalf. ‘Take it!’ Frodo received it on his shrinking palm….

Frodo holds out his hand, trusting Gandalf but clearly wondering why. Gandalf drops the ring onto his palm, and he flinches under it. Gandalf gets up from beside the hearth, moves away a little to stand with his back to Frodo. It is more evident now that he is travel-stained, muddy and weary.
Gandalf: What can you see? Can you see anything?

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past48) Gandalf: ‘Can you see any markings on it?’
‘No. There are none.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past49) ‘Hold it up!’ said Gandalf. ‘And look closely!’

Frodo (turns the ring between his fingers): Nothing. There’s nothing.
Gandalf lets out a relieved breath.
Frodo: Wait…
Gandalf freezes, his eyes turning toward Frodo. All the relief drains away from him in an instant. On the ring, bright lettering begins to emerge.
Frodo: There are markings. It’s some form of Elvish. I can’t read it.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past49) …He now saw fine lines, finer than the finest pen-strokes, running along the ring, outside and inside: lines of fire that seemed to form the letters of a flowing script. They shone piercingly bright, and yet remote, as if out of a great depth.
‘I cannot read the fiery letters,’ said Frodo in a quavery voice.

Gandalf (with dread): There are few who can. The language is that of Mordor, which I will not utter here.
Frodo (in disbelief): Mordor?!
Gandalf: In the common tongue, it says ‘One Ring to Rule them all, One Ring to find them. One Ring to bring them all, and in the darkness bind them.’

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past49) ‘No,’ said Gandalf, ‘but I can. The letters are Elvish, of an ancient mode, but the language is that of Mordor, which I will not utter here. … But this in the Common Tongue is what is said, close enough.
One Ring to bring them all
and in the darkness bind them.

It is only two lines of a verse long known in Elven lore:
Three Rings for the Elven-kings under the sky,
Seven for the Dwarf-lords in their halls of stone,
Nine for Mortal Men doomed to die,
One for the Dark Lord on his dark throne
In the land of Mordor where the shadows lie.
One Ring to rule them all,
One Ring to find them,
One Ring to bring them all
and in the darkness bind them.
In the land of Mordor where the shadows lie.’.

Gandalf sits smoking at Frodo’s table, upon which the Ring site, plain gold again. Both of them watch it for much of the conversation. Frodo pours hot water into the teapot on the table.
Gandalf: This is the One Ring, forged by the Dark Lord Sauron in the fires of Mount Doom, taken by Isildur from the hand of Sauron himself.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past51) This is the Master-ring, the One Ring to rule them all. This is the One Ring that he lost many ages ago, to the great weakening of his power.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past51) Gandalf: ‘…And Isildur’s son cut the Ring from Sauron’s hand and took it for his own.’

Frodo (cradling his cup in his hands): Bilbo found it. In Gollum’s cave.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 39) ‘I have heard his story, how he found it, and how he used it.’

Gandalf: Yes. For sixty years the Ring lay quiet in Bilbo’s keeping, prolonging his life, delaying old age. But no longer, Frodo. Evil is stirring in Mordor. The Ring has awoken. It’s heard its master’s call.
Frodo: But he was destroyed. Sauron was destroyed.
There is a harsh whisper from the Ring, a few unintelligible words – both Frodo and Gandalf look down at it in horror.
Gandalf: No, Frodo. The spirit of Sauron endured. His life force is bound to the Ring, and the Ring survived. Sauron has returned. His orcs have multiplied, his fortress of Barad-dur is rebuilt in the land of Mordor. Sauron needs only this Ring to cover all the lands in a second darkness. He is seeking it, seeking it, all his thought is bent on it. The ring yearns above all else to return to the hand of its master. They are one … the Ring and the Dark Lord. Frodo … he must never find it.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past43) …The evil power in Mirkwood had been driven out by the White Council only to reappear in greater strength in the old strongholds of Mordor. The Dark Tower had been rebuilt, it was said. From there the power was spreading far and wide, and away far east and south there were wars and growing fear. Orcs were multiplying again in the mountains.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past51) Gandalf: ‘He is seeking it, seeking it, and all his thought is bent on it.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past50) Gandalf: ‘[Sauron] has indeed arisen…’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past50) Gandalf: ‘The Enemy still lacks one thing to give him strength and knowledge to beat down all resistance, break the last defences, and cover all the lands in a second darkness. He lacks the One Ring.’ … ‘He let a great part of his own former power pass into it, so that he could rule all the others. … [He has] returned to his ancient fastness in the Dark Tower of Mordor.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past49) ‘He greatly desires it – but he must not get it.’
Book 3: Chapter V – The White Rider 487) Gandalf, of Saruman: ‘His thought is ever on the Ring.’
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 54) Gandalf: ‘There was more than one power at work, Frodo. The Ring was trying to get back to its master. It had slipped from Isildur’s hand and betrayed him; then when a chance came it caught poor Déagol, and he was murdered; and after that Gollum, and it had devoured him…. So now, when its master was awake once more and sending out his dark thought from Mirkwood, it abandoned Gollum. Only to be picked up by the most unlikely person imaginable: Bilbo from the Shire!’

Frodo picks up the Ring from the table and moves quickly into the next room, looking about wildly for a possible place. Gandalf follows more slowly.
Frodo: All right. We put it away. We keep it hidden. We never speak of it again. No one knows it’s here, do they? (When there is no response, he turns, slowly, with dread in his face.) Do they, Gandalf?
Gandalf (clearly hating to say it): There is one other that knew that Bilbo had the Ring. I looked everywhere for the creature Gollum. But the enemy found him first.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past57) ‘Together we sought for Gollum down the whole length of Wilderland, without hope, and without success. … But I am afraid there is no possible doubt: he had made his slow, sneaking way, step by step, mile by mile, south, down at last to the Land of Mordor.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond Aragorn: ‘I went with Gandalf on the long and hopeless search.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 246) Gandalf: ‘…He had found the creature called Gollum.’
Aragorn: ‘But now the trail was fresh and swift, and it led not to Mordor but away.’

There is what can only be a machine of torture, tended by quite a large number of Orcs. There is fire involved. All that is visible of Gollum are his hands, reaching out in agony as he screams.

I don’t know how long they tortured him for. But amidst the endless screams and inane babble, they discerned two words.
Gollum (in torment): SHIRE! BAGGINS!

Prologue: Of the Finding of the Ring 12) …his enemy’s cries of hate and despair: Thief, thief! Baggins! We hates it forever!
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 56) Gandalf: ‘He hated Bilbo and cursed his name. What is more, he knew where he came from.…He whined and cringed, and rubbed his long hands, licking his fingers as if they pained him, as if he remembered some old torture.’

Frodo: Shire! Baggins?! But that will lead them here!

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past58) ‘And [Sauron] has at last heard, I think, of hobbits and the Shire! . … the long-unnoticed name of Baggins has become important.’

******************************************************************************************************************
Two Black Riders gallop along a road in the night – a road in the Shire, for a hobbit, one of the Bounders, steps out, holding up a lantern.
Hobbit: Who goes there?
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past
58) Sam: ‘The Bounders have never been so busy before.’
As the lead horseman rides him down, a sword descends.
Book 1: Chapter XI – A Knife in the Dark 173) [The Black Riders] ran down the guards at the gate and vanished from the Shire.
******************************************************************************************************************
Frodo runs up to Gandalf, holding the Ring up urgently.
Frodo: Take it Gandalf! Take it!
Gandalf stumbles backward out of reach.
Gandalf (with fear in his voice): No, Frodo!
Frodo: You must take it!
Gandalf (more firmly): You cannot offer me this Ring.
Frodo (cries out): I’m giving it to you!
Gandalf (in a not-quite-steady voice): DON’T … tempt me, Frodo!
Frodo closes his fingers around the Ring, and drops his hand.
Gandalf: I dare not take it. (whispers) Not even to keep it safe. Understand, Frodo, I would use this Ring from a desire to do good. But through me, it would wield a power too great and terrible to imagine.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 34) ‘No, don’t give the ring to me,’ said Gandalf.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past60) ‘Will you not take the Ring?’
‘No!’ cried Gandalf, springing to his feet. ‘With that power I should have power too great and terrible. And over me the Ring would gain a power still greater and more deadly.’ His eyes flashed and his face was lit as by a fire within. ‘Do not tempt me! For I do not wish to become like the Dark Lord himself. Yet the way of the Ring to my heart is by pity, pity for weakness and the desire of strength to do good. Do not tempt me! I dare not take it, not even to keep it safe, unused. The wish to wield it would be too great for my strength. I shall have such need of it. Great perils lie before me.’

Frodo: But it cannot stay in the Shire!

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past61) Frodo: ‘I cannot keep the Ring and stay here. I ought to leave Bag End, leave the Shire, leave everything and go away.’
… Gandalf: ‘The ring will not be able to stay hidden in the Shire much longer.’

Gandalf: No! – no it can’t.
Frodo (swallows hard and closes the Ring tightly in his hand: realizations are coming painfully. Very quietly): What must I do?
Frodo opens a cupboard, pulls out a shirt, stuffs it into a backpack.
Gandalf: You must leave. And leave quickly.

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 65) ‘You ought to go quietly, and you ought to go soon.’

Frodo: Where? Where do I go?

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 65) ‘For where am I to go?’

Gandalf: Get out of the Shire. Make for the village of Bree.
Gandalf neatly rolls up another shirt. Frodo takes it from him, unrolling it in doing so, and stuffs it in his bag.
Frodo: Bree… What about you?
Frodo moves quickly into the kitchen.
Gandalf (following): I’ll be waiting for you, at the Inn of the Prancing Pony.

Book 1: Chapter VIII – Fog on the Barrow-downs 144) Tom Bombadil: ‘Tom will give you good advice, till this day is over …: four miles along the Road you’ll come upon a village, Bree under Bree-hill, with doors looking westward. There you’ll find an old inn that is called The Prancing Pony. Barliman Butterbur is the worthy keeper. There you can stay the night…’
Book 1: Chapter X – Strider 166) THE PRANCING PONY: BREE…Leave a message for me here, if you pass through Bree…. – Gandalf

Frodo puts a pair of apples into his bag, wraps up a seed cake in a cloth.
Frodo: And the Ring will be safe there?
Gandalf: I don’t know, Frodo. I don’t have any answers. I must see the head of my order. He is both wise, and powerful. Trust me, Frodo. He’ll know what to do.
Frodo hurries into the study and pulls on his coat. Gandalf helps him on with his backpack.
You’ll have to leave the name of Baggins behind you, for that name is not safe outside the Shire. Travel only by day, and stay off the road.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past47) ‘[Saruman] is great among the Wise. He is the chief of my order and the head of the Council.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 250) ‘For Saruman the White is the greatest of my order.’
Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 61) ‘Leave the name of Baggins behind you; that name will not be safe to have outside the Shire or in the Wild.’
Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 75) ‘… I think we will move on now,’ said Frodo; ‘but not on the road – in case that rider comes back, or another follows him.’
Book 1: Chapter V – A Conspiracy Unmasked 105) Frodo: ‘I am starting tomorrow, as soon as it is light. But I am not going by road: it would be safer to wait here than that.’

Gandalf passes a staff to Frodo.
Frodo: I can cut across country easily enough.

Book 1: Chapter IV – A Short Cut to Mushrooms 86) Frodo: ‘I am going to cut straight across country from here.’

He tucks the Ring into the breast pocket of his coat, and faces Gandalf, ready to go.
Gandalf (with great fondness): My dear Frodo. Hobbits really are amazing creatures. You can learn all that there is to know about their ways in a month, and yet after a hundred years, they can still surprise you.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past61) ‘My dear Frodo. Hobbits really are amazing creatures, as I have said before. You can learn all that there is to know about their ways in a month, and yet after a hundred years, they can still surprise you at a pinch’

Frodo smiles back up at him.
There is a rustling outside the open window. Both look over in alarm.
Gandalf: Get down.
Frodo drops immediately, his staff thumping to the floor with him. Gandalf slaps his staff to the ready in his right hand, and stalks to the window, where the rustling continues, and the flowers are shaking. He strikes with his staff, out the window and down, and there is a thump and a cry in a voice Frodo may recognize. Gandalf reaches out and hauls Samwise in through the window to drop him on the table.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past61) Suddenly he stopped as if listening. … Gandalf crept to one side of the window. Then with a dart he sprang to the sill, and thrust a long arm out and downwards. There was a squawk, and up came Sam Gamgee’s curly head hauled by one ear.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past62) …Putting out both his arms [Gandalf] lifted the astonished Sam, shears, grass clippings and all, right through the window and stood him on the floor.

Gandalf: Confound it all, Samwise Gamgee! Have you been eavesdropping?
Sam (talking fast, obviously scared, hands up in surrender and supplication): I haven’t been dropping no eaves, sir. Honest. I was just cutting the grass under the window there, if you follow me.
Gandalf: A little late for trimming the verge, don’t you think?

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past62) ‘Well, well, bless my beard! Sam Gamgee, is it? Now what may you be doing?’
‘Lor bless me, Mr. Gandalf, sir!’ said Sam. ‘Nothing! Leastways I was just trimming the grass-border under the window, if you follow me…’
‘… How long have you been eavesdropping?’
‘Eavesdropping, sir? I don’t follow you, begging your pardon. There ain’t no eaves at Bag End, and that’s a fact.’

Sam: I heard raised voices…
Gandalf: What did you hear? SPEAK!

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past62) ‘What have you heard, and why did you listen?’ Gandalf’s eyes flashed and his brows stuck out like bristles.

Sam (stammering badly): N-n-n-nothing important. That is I heard a good deal about a Ring, a Dark Lord, and something about the end of the world, but, please Mr. Gandalf, sir, please don’t ‘urt me. (Gandalf’s eyebrows rise) Don’t turn me into anything – unnatural…

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past62) ‘Mr. Frodo, sir! Don’t let him hurt me, sir! Don’t let him turn me into anything unnatural! My old dad would take on so…. I heard a deal that I didn’t rightly understand, about an enemy, and rings, and Mr. Bilbo, sir, and dragons, and a fiery mountain, and – and Elves, sir. I listened because I couldn’t help myself, if you know what I mean. Lor bless me, sir, but I do love tales of that sort. …’

Gandalf: Nooo…? (looks up at Frodo, who smiles back, faintly) Perhaps not… (softly and ominously) I’ve thought of a better use for you…
Sam does not appear to be reassured.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past62-3) ‘Get up, Sam!’ said Gandalf. ‘I have thought of something better than that. Something to shut your mouth, and punish you properly for listening. You shall go away with Mr. Frodo.’
‘Me, sir!’ cried Sam, springing up like a dog invited for a walk. ‘Me go and see Elves and all! Hurray!’ he shouted, and then burst into tears.

******************************************************************************************************************
Dawn: Gandalf leads his horse along a fence line, Frodo beside him. Another figure, heavily laden, hurries to catch up.
Gandalf: Come along, Samwise, keep up. (He leads them into the trees) Be careful, both of you. The enemy has many spies in his service: Birds, beasts… (to Frodo) Is it safe?

Book 1: Chapter XI – A Knife in the Dark 179) Strider: ‘Not all the birds are to be trusted, and there are other spies more evil than they are.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 245) Gandalf: ‘Soon I became aware that spies of many sorts, even beasts and birds, were gathered round the Shire. …’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 253) Saruman: ‘For I have many eyes in my service.’

Frodo presses his hand to his breast pocket.
Gandalf (crouches to look Frodo in the face): Never put it on. For the agent of the Dark Lord will be drawn to its power. (staring at that pocket and what it holds) Always remember, Frodo. The Ring is trying to get back to its master. It wants to be found.

Book 1: Chapter I – A Long-Expected Party 40) ‘But if you will take my advice you will use it very seldom, or not at all. At least I beg you not to use it in any way that will cause talk or rouse suspicion. …I say again: keep it safe, and keep it secret!’
Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 66) ‘Let me impress on you once more: don’t use it!’’
Book 1: Chapter XI – A Knife in the Dark 185) ‘Also,’ [Strider] added, and his voice sank to a whisper, ‘the Ring draws them.’

With a final clasp of Frodo’s shoulder, Gandalf is off, riding fast into the trees.
Frodo and Sam hear a bird with amazing timing screeching as it goes through the branches. Frodo looks about nervously, then back to exchange a long look with Sam, who looks more resigned than anything else. With a deep breath, Frodo starts off, with Sam following closely (and clanking softly). Frodo’s pack is of a respectable size, but Sam’s is quite huge.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past69) Frodo: ‘I suspect you have taken more than your share, Sam, and I shall look into it at our next packing.’
They make their way through countryside, until Sam stops suddenly in the middle of a field.
Sam: This is it.
Frodo: This is what?
Sam: If I take one more step, it’ll be the farthest away from home I’ve ever been.

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 70) Sam knew the land well within twenty miles of Hobbiton, but that was the limit of his geography.
Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 72) [Pippin] sat down on the bank at the side of the road and looked away east into the haze, beyond which lay the River, and the end of the Shire in which he had spent all his life. Sam stood by him. His round eyes were wide open – for he was looking across lands he had never seen to a new horizon.

Frodo (Walks back towards Sam): Come on, Sam.
Sam takes that step stiffly, as though over a physical obstacle. Frodo puts his hand on Sam’s shoulder as they walk on.
Frodo: Remember what Bilbo used to say? ‘It’s a dangerous business…’ The voice changes to Bilbo’s
Bilbo: ‘Frodo, going out your door. You step out onto the road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there’s no knowing where you might be swept off to.’

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 72) He used often to say there was only one Road; that it was like a great river: its spring were at every doorstep, and every path was its tributary. “It’s a dangerous business, Frodo, going out of your door,” he used to say. “You step into the Road, and if you don’t keep your feet, there is no knowing here you might be swept off to. Do you realize that this is the very path that goes through Mirkwood, and if you let it, it might take you to the Lonely Mountain, or even further and to worse places?”’

They are camped at evening, Sam, pipe in mouth, cooks at a small fire as Frodo relaxes on a broad tree branch with his own pipe.
Book 4: Chapter IV – Of Herbs and Stewed Rabbit 638) Sam was a good cook, even by hobbit reckoning, and he had done a great deal of the camp-cooking on their travels, when there was a chance…
Sweet voices catch Frodo’s ear, and he props himself up on his elbow to listen. He smiles.
Frodo (whispers): Sam! (Sam looks up, then hears the music himself) Wood elves!
They go together to covertly watch a company of Elves traveling through the woods. It is a beautiful company, clad in flowing robes and cloaks of white and silver and blue; some, including the leader, carry filmy banners; others ride on white horses; around all of them shines a soft white light.
Frodo (quietly): They’re going to the harbour, beyond the White Towers – to the Grey Havens.
Sam: They’re leaving Middle-earth.
Frodo: Never to return.
Sam: I don’t know why … it makes me sad.

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 77) Sam and Pippin crouched behind a large tree-bole….
‘Elves,’ exclaimed Sam… ‘Elves, sir!’
Prologue 6) Three Elf-towers of immemorial age were still to be seen on the Tower Hills beyond the western marches. They shone far off in the moonlight…
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past44) ‘And I’ve heard tell that Elves are moving West. They do say they are going to the harbours out away beyond the White Towers.’ Sam waved his arm vaguely… it was an old tradition that away over there stood the Grey Havens, from which at times elven-ships set sail, never to return. ‘They are sailing, sailing, sailing over the Sea, they are going into the West and leaving us,’ said Sam, half chanting the words, shaking his head sadly and solemnly.
Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 77) One clear voice rose now above the others. It was singing in the fair elven tongue…
Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 78) They passed slowly, and the hobbits could see the starlight glimmering on their hair and in their eyes. They bore no lights, yet as they walked a shimmer, like the light of the moon above the rim of the hills before it rises, seemed to fall about their feet.
Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 42) Elves … could now be seen passing westward through the woods in the evening, passing and not returning, but they were leaving Middle-earth and were no longer concerned with its troubles.

Frodo is apparently asleep … beyond him on the other side of the fire Sam is not so lucky. He is shifting uncomfortably on the ground.
Sam: Everywhere I lie, there’s a dirty great root sticking into my back.
Frodo (soothingly, not opening his eyes): Just shut your eyes, and imagine that you’re back in your own bed, with a soft mattress, and a lovely feather pillow.

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 71) Frodo woke up first, and found that a tree-root had made a hole in his back…‘And all my beautiful feather beds are sold to the Sackville-Bagginses! These tree-roots would do them good.’

Sam puts his head back down, closes his eyes, and dutifully tries it. For a moment.
Sam (plaintively): It’s not working, Mr. Frodo… I’m never going to be able to sleep out here.

Book 1: Chapter III – Three Is Company 71) The fox: ‘I have seldom heard of a hobbit sleeping out of doors under a tree.’

Frodo (very quietly, with an amused smile): Me neither, Sam.
Sam spots something by the fire, picks it up, and puts his head back down, popping a piece of it in his mouth.

They are unaware that a dark rider surveys the Shire from a crest: danger is closer than they know.
Book 1: Chapter IV – A Short Cut to Mushrooms Through an opening in the trees [Sam] caught a glimpse of the top of the green bank form which they had climbed down … on the edge high above them they saw against the sky a horse standing. Beside it stooped a black figure.
*****************************************************************************************************************
Gandalf gallops along an arrow-straight path amid lush trees, pulling up at the base of a dark tower. A figure in white is descending a long stair: Saruman. Gandalf dismounts, winded, and removes his hat.
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 251) ‘…Isengard is a circle of sheer rocks that enclose a valley as with a wall, and in the midst of that valley is a tower of stone called Orthanc….it is very tall and has many secrets. … But I rode to the foot of Orthanc, and came to the stair of Saruman, and there he met me and led me up to his high chamber. He wore a ring on his finger.’
Book 3: Chapter VIII – The Road to Isengard 541) A peak and isle of rock it was, black and gleaming hard: four mighty piers of many-sided stone were welded into one, but near the summit they opened into gaping horns, their pinnacles sharp as the points of spears, keen-edged as knives.

Saruman: Smoke rises from the mountain of Doom, and the hour grows late, and Gandalf the Grey rides to Isengard, seeking my counsel. For that is why you have come, is it not? My old friend. (Saruman smiles.)

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 239) Boromir: ‘Smoke rises once more from Orodruin, that we call Mount Doom.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 252) ‘ “So you have come, Gandalf,” he said to me gravely.’

Gandalf: Saruman. (bows his head)
Gandalf and Saruman walk on the lawn of Orthanc, surrounded by trees in bloom.
Book 3: Chapter VIII – The Road to Isengard 540) Once it had been fair and green.
Book 3: Chapter VIII – The Road to Isengard 541) Once it had been green and filled with avenues, and groves of fruitful trees…

Saruman: You are sure of this?
Gandalf: Beyond any doubt.
Saruman: So the Ring of Power has been found.
Gandalf: All these long years, it was in the Shire, under my very nose.
Saruman: Yet you did not have the wits to see it. Your love of the Halflings’ leaf has clearly slowed your mind.

From UT: The Hunt for the Ring: “…Saruman had long taken an interest in the Shire – because Gandalf did, and he was suspicious of him; and because (again in secret imitation of Gandalf) he had taken to the ‘Halflings’ leaf’, and needed supplies, but in pride (having once scoffed at Gandalf’s use of the weed)”

Gandalf: But we still have time. Time enough to counter Sauron if we act quickly.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past47) Gandalf: ‘But I said to myself … there is time yet. Wait!’

Saruman: Time? (They stop) What time do you think we have?
In a high chamber, obviously Saruman’s workroom, Saruman sits in a high-backed chair. Gandalf stands near, staff in one hand, a glass of red wine in the other.
Saruman: Sauron has regained much of his former strength. He cannot yet take physical form, but his spirit has lost none of its potency. Concealed within his fortress, the Lord of Mordor sees all. His gaze pierces cloud, shadow, earth and flesh. You know of what I speak, Gandalf. A Great Eye, lidless, wreathed in flame.

Book 4: Chapter II – The Passage of the Marshes 616) The Eye: that horrible growing sense of a hostile will that strove with great power to pierce all shadows of cloud, and earth, and flesh, and to see you…
Book 2: Chapter VII – The Mirror of Galadriel 355) But suddenly the Mirror went altogether dark, as dark as if a hole had opened in the world of stars, and Frodo looked into emptiness. In the black abyss there appeared a single Eye that slowly grew, until it filled nearly all the Mirror. So terrible was it that Frodo stood rooted, unable to cry out or to withdraw his gaze. The Eye was rimmed with fire, but was itself glazed, yellow as a cat’s, watchful and intent, and the black slit of its pupil opened on a pit, a window into nothing.

Gandalf (softly, with dread): The Eye of Sauron.
Saruman: He is gathering all evil to him. Very soon he will summon an army great enough to launch an assault upon Middle-earth.
Gandalf: You know this? How?
Saruman turns his head to look through an archway into another room. He smiles faintly.
Saruman: I have seen it.
Gandalf strides into the adjoining room, followed by Saruman. There is a pedestal in the center of the room, which holds a shrouded spherical object. Gandalf stops beside it.
Gandalf: A palantir is a dangerous tool, Saruman.
Saruman: Why? Why should we fear to use it? Pulls the cloth away to reveal the palantir, black and clouded.
Book 3: Chapter X – The Voice of Saruman 569) A globe of crystal, dark, but glowing with a heart of fire.
Gandalf: They are not all accounted for, the lost Seeing-stones. We do not know who else may be watching.
He takes the cloth from Saruman’s hand and throws it over the sphere again. There is a growling mutter and a flash of the Eye as Gandalf pulls his hand away. Saruman walks away to seat himself in a chair like a throne.
Saruman: The hour is later than you think. Sauron’s forces are already moving. The Nine have left Minas Morgul.
Gandalf (whispers): The Nine?
Saruman: They crossed the River Isen on Midsummer’s Eve, disguised as riders in black.

Book 1: Chapter II – The Shadow of the Past 60) Gandalf: ‘The Enemy is moving.’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 250) Gandalf quoting Radagast: ‘”Nazgûl,” he whispered. “The Nine are abroad again. They have crossed the River secretly and are moving westward. They have taken the guise of riders in black.”’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 251) Gandalf quoting Radagast: ‘”I was told to find you before Midsummer, and that is now here.”’
Appendix B 1066) September 18 – Gandalf escapes from Orthanc in the early hours. The Black Riders cross the Fords of Isen.

Gandalf: They’ve reached the Shire –

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 251) Gandalf quoting Radagast: “Even if you set out from this spot, you will hardly reach [Saruman] before the Nine discover the land that they seek.”

Saruman: They will find the Ring, and kill the one who carries it.
Gandalf (softly): Frodo!

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 254) ‘Fear was ever in my heart for my friends in the Shire….’

He turns and starts for the door, but before he takes three steps toward it, it closes in his face. He begins to move toward another of the four doors ranged along the four walls, but takes only one step before it slams. The third closes to him as well, as does the fourth. Saruman has simply glanced at each in its turn. Gandalf slumps, leaning on his staff.
Saruman: You do not seriously think that a Hobbit could contend with the will of Sauron? There are none who can. (Gandalf’s eyes widen and his head lifts, and he turns in shock to face Saruman) Against the power of Mordor, there can be no victory. We must join with him, Gandalf. We must join with Sauron. It would be wise, my friend.

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 252) Gandalf quoting Saruman ‘”And listen, Gandalf, my old friend and helper! I said we, for we it may be, if you will join with me…. A new Power is rising. Against it the old allies and policies will not avail us at all.”’
Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 253) ‘We may join with that Power. It would be wise, Gandalf.’

Gandalf: Tell me, ‘friend’. When did Saruman the Wise abandon reason for madness?

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 253) ‘I cannot think that you brought me so far only to weary my ears.’ )

With a flare of his eyes and a shout, Saruman sends Gandalf flying to pin him against the wall, high above the floor – and then lets him drop. There follows a pitched battle using their staves and voices, and they seem nearly evenly matched, though Gandalf is soon bleeding and obviously in pain. Than with a sharp gesture and a word Saruman pulls the staff from Gandalf’s hand, across the room into his own hand. With a staff in either hand, he stalks slowly toward where Gandalf lies bleeding.
Saruman: I gave you the chance of aiding me willingly, but you have elected the way of pain!

Book 2: Chapter II – The Council of Elrond 253) ‘…I gave you the chance of aiding me willingly, and so saving yourself much trouble and pain. The third choice is to stay here, until the end.’

Saruman gestures with both staves, and Gandalf falls upward, plummeting to the top of the tower. Gandalf’s shout echoes as he vanishes from sight …

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